Please click through the photo album. . . . . Read the story below. . . . 2015, the tree called "Scrape" shows healthy growth despite a history of "hits" by the Pine Bark Beetle. It's health was improved by Cooperative BioBalance treatments. This tree and the hundreds of other trees on the property were also part of a three-way EcoPeace Treaty with the Pine Bark Beetles and homeowners.
2015, the tree called "Scrape" shows healthy growth despite a history of "hits" by the Pine Bark Beetle.  It
In a photo from 2009: conventional practices included cutting down green trees because they showed signs of as few as one “hit” by the Pine Bark Beetle. On properties that received Cooperative BioBalance treatment by Dr. Conroy, owners stopped the practice of cutting down live trees. Trees--such as "Scrape"--that received many “hits” for years continued to thrive.
In a photo from 2009: conventional practices included cutting down green trees because they showed signs of as few as one “hit” by the Pine Bark Beetle. On properties that received Cooperative BioBalance treatment by Dr. Conroy, owners stopped the practice of cutting down live trees. Trees--such as "Scrape"--that received many “hits” for years continued to thrive.
In a photo from 2013, a tree called “Scrape” is shown with both a lush green canopy with big growth candles and tracks from Beetle Larvae on a section of bark what was scraped-off by the owner felling a nearby tree. The tree is healthy after many hits. This tree and thousands like it on CoExistence Technologies treated properties shows that conventional ideas are wrong about cutting down a tree that is ‘hit’ by the beetle. A healthy tree can withstand multiple hits and continue to grow. Scrape continues to thrive in 2015.
940 2013 Scrape series
2007, Colorado. This is one of countless mountainsides of dead and dying Lodgepole Pine trees. The Pine Bark Beetle was blamed, but they were not the real cause of the trees' deaths. The trees were weakened by drought, changes in climate, lack of fire, and other environmental factors. The insects simply took advantage of the trees' weakness.
2007, Colorado.  This is one of countless mountainsides of dead and dying Lodgepole Pine trees. The Pine Bark Beetle was blamed, but they were not the real cause of the trees
Pine Bark Beetles shown on a cut-down tree. The larvae burrow under the bark. The adult beetles fly in June, land on trees, and lay their eggs.
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After tree death, see the burrowing paths made by the feeding Pine Bark larvae. The burrowing disrupts the circulation system of the tree. Feeding larvae are agents of death to weak trees, but—according to Dr.Conroy—not the true cause of death.
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By 2011, after 4 years of Tree Whispering® and Co-Existence Technologies™ bioenergy healing treatments by Dr. Jim Conroy, recovery of the trees at the test sites was visible. Green, lush trees are shown among the “silver ghosts” which were already dead for many years.
By 2011, after 4 years of Tree Whispering® and Co-Existence Technologies™ bioenergy healing treatments by Dr. Jim Conroy, recovery of the trees at the test sites was visible.  Green, lush trees are shown among the “silver ghosts” which were already dead for many years.
Healthier trees were able to withstand a small number of “hits” by the beetles and continued robust growth as seen here with the spring, 2011, growth candles.
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By June, 2011, recovery was progressing. Note the green trees—no red ones—among the long-dead “silver ghosts” on the lower area of on of the test sites.
P1180868 June 24, 2011 the Road Weiss
June 12, 2013. The same scene looking even more lush. Healthy, green Lodgepole Pine Trees and the Pine Bark Beetle co-exist on this property.
June 12, 2013. The same scene looking even more lush.  June 12, 2013. The same scene looking even more lush.  Healthy, green Lodgepole Pine Trees and the Pine Bark Beetle co-exist on this property.
The same scene again in 2015. (Note the road on the right.) Trees whose health was improved by Cooperative BioBalance and whose relationship with the Pine Bark Beetle was balanced by an EcoPeace Treaty show in green. The "grey ghosts" have been dead for many years now.
P1030682 2015 Moose Snort View
In a photo from 2009, an untreated area is a sharp contrast. Dr. Conroy believes that a combination of stress factors weakened all of the Lodgepole Pine trees. Please see the whole story below to learn the stress factors.
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In a photo from 2009, reddening is the major indication of a dying tree. After Lodgepole Pine trees are “hit” and the larvae burrow to feed, weak trees often die. Larvae also carry a fungus that stains the inside of the tree blue. But they don’t have to die.
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In a photo from 2009: Why are small, young trees “hit” by the beetle? Because even the young trees were weak. This shows that the beetle infestation was not a natural process of reforestation.
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Updated for 2017

Institute for Cooperative BioBalance® EcoSystem Research Study Overview

The Lodgepole Pine and Pine Bark Beetle EcoSystem Research Study in Colorado

During a ski trip to Colorado in early 2007, Institute for Cooperative BioBalance® co-founder Ms. Basia Alexander noticed that whole sides of mountains were turning red and brown.  It was the Lodgepole Pine Trees dying.  Basia inquired at the ski town’s municipal offices and was told that the Pine Bark Beetle was to blame.  The environmental official told her that there was nothing to be done to save the trees.

Marie invited Dr. Jim and Basia to Colorado.

Marie invited Dr. Jim and Basia to Colorado.

Serendipidously, later that summer, a woman approached the Tree Whispering display booth at a trade show in New Jersey.  Marie was visiting from the Winter Park area of Colorado.  She expressed great concern for all the Lodgepole Pines, explaining that the conventional approach to the problem was to simply cut the trees down, even if they had only one “hit” from the Pine Bark Beetles.

Marie invited Dr. Jim and Basia to her property in Fraser, Colorado.  By the time Dr. Jim and Basia flew out in autumn of 2007, Marie had organized appointments with many of her friends who had similar concerns for their trees.

That was the beginning of a multi-year study by Dr. Jim on many properties in the Winter Park/Fraser and Vail, Colorado areas.

Stress Factors

During Dr. Jim’s 2007  bioenergy-based, hands-on communication and healing sessions with the Lodgepole Pines on multiple properties, he discovered that the Pine Bark Beetle was not the cause of the Lodgepole Pines’ problems, but was only the last in a series of stressors to the trees.

Stress factors to the Lodgepole Pines include:

  • nine or more years of summer drought,
  • shorter and warmer winters favoring beetle larvae survival,
  • higher pollution levels,
  • lack of fire as a natural thinning process in the forest,
  • blue stain fungus brought in by the beetle larvae,
  • and others.

Dr. Jim always asks the question, “Which comes first, the sick tree or the insects?”  Lodgepole Pines’s health was weakened by multiple factors, making them susceptible to the final insult: the beetle larvae’s feeding activities.

Starting in late 2007

When Dr. Jim and Basia arrived in late 2007, many test sites already had trees that were “hit” by the beetles and were reddening.  Those would go on to die.  But, each site had trees that had a chance to survive.  Dr. Jim’s first treatment at each site addressed the trees’ compromised circulation systems and prepared the trees for the coming winter.

Dr. Jim and Basia returned in late May, 2008.  On this visit, treatments centered around strengthening the trees’ inner health and preparing them for the immanent flight of the adult beetles.  This is when the beetles lay their eggs in new trees.

Upon their return in mid-October, they were told that the 2008 beetle fly had been “large” and that many more trees were cut down in the valley.  However, at the test sites, the trees that were green the previous spring were still green.  Any trees that already showed signs of reddening, were either very red or cut down by the owners.

EcoPeace Treaty Structure

People are an integral part of an EcoPeace Treaty. Their role is to be responsible for the well-being of the Whole Emergent Ecosystem. One person may also take on the role of facilitator of the treaty. An EcoPeace Treaty is a three-part agreement among lliving Beings of Nature in the Context of a healthy, fully interconnected ecosystem.

People are an integral part of an EcoPeace Treaty. Their role is to be responsible for the well-being of the Whole Emergent Ecosystem. One person may also take on the role of facilitator of the treaty. An EcoPeace Treaty is a three-part agreement among lliving Beings of Nature in the Context of a healthy, fully interconnected ecosystem.

“Scrape” gives a window into the trees

Every year the Lodgepole Pine trees on the research study properties grew and thrived.  The Pine Bark Beetle was still present in the forest and even present in the trees.  “Scrape” proves that the trees and the beetles were co-existing through 2013.

2013 Scrape series 511

“Scrape” is a tree on the edge of an area that the property owner cleared of other trees.  Often, when clearing, the cutter will drop a tree that scrapes another tree that is not intended to be cut down.  This injures the tree.  Thanks to Dr. Conroy’s holistic bioenergy treatments, the tree we call “Scrape” continues to thrive.

One small benefit from this injury was that it allowed the area just under the bark of the tree to be viewed. Notice that this young, small diameter tree, has tracks from feeding Pine Bark Beetle larvae.  At the same time, note that the tree has robust growth; no signs of reddening at all.  This shows that the Lodgepole Pines (even young ones) and the Pine Bark Beetle can co-exist in the ecosystem if both are healthy and in dynamic balance.

This is Scrape in 2015.  Notice that the tree has weathered, but it is still growing strong despite the many “hits” it received in past years.

2015 Scrape at Moose Snort

The Study Continues until today…

Conroy and Alexander have returned to the test sites in Vail and at Winter Park/Fraser, Colorado, a total of 12 times through August of 2015.  In fact, we went twice in 2015!

During each of their visits, Dr. Jim provided his hands-on bioenergy healing treatments to strengthen inner functionality, address circulation issues caused by the beetles and the blue stain, and promote growth.  And, each time, the test site properties showed robust growth on healthy trees.  Some of the Lodgepole Pine trees even showed signs of recent beetle hits but were still green and healthy.  That showed that healthy trees could withstand the presence of the Pine Bark Beetles without being killed.

Dr. Conroy’s bioenergy healing approach is unconventional.  He establishes an intuitive communication with the tree and with the insects to find out how both life forms might co-exist.

Please read the stories of Lodgepole Pine trees and the Pine Bark Beetles at our sister website EcoPeaceTreaties.org

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